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“Food as medicine” and how do supplements help?

What do you mean by “food as medicine” and how do supplements help?

A lot of folks don’t get it when we say that food is medicine. Or they are stumped at how the herbs in #drericsoffice can help them personally. And, unless you have a very personal consultation and blood work or other tests done, this is difficult to explain because we are all completely unique walking chemical experiments. Read on!…

So… just for fun, I asked #DrEric to give me an example…I said, ” I’m a new patient. I’m a woman in my mid 40’s. I’m tired, depressed, I am gaining weight, losing my hair, and I drink too much wine.😜😂😫
Without any further tests and just as an example, what might you suggest I try?”
.
Here are some supplements that he might start you off with (btw this is not a diagnosis and you must not go out and buy these on your own without consulting a doctor).


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“We must assume your current condition is a result of imbalances in your hormone system as well as a depletion in neuro transmitter function.
1) Serotone Active: amino acids & St. John’s wort to support the brain’s serotonin levels and to help combat low mood.
2) Chaste Tree (aka Vitex): many women during menopause or perimenopause, suffer from symptoms of estrogen dominance. Chaste Tree is an herb that can help influence progesterone production, thereby balancing excess estrogen.
3) Cruciferous Complete: contains cruciferous vegetables (kale & brussel sprouts). Phytonutrients increase the liver’s ability to break down toxins including excess hormones like estrogen or dht (a form of testosterone that can lead to thinning hair). 4) Rhodiola & Schisandra: adrenals usually play a role in perimenopause. When adrenals are thrown off, any menopausal symptoms are worsened. Rhodiola & Schisandra are adaptogens that help balance cortisol levels in the body. High cortisol can contribute to thinning hair, fatigue, low mood, anxiousness, weight gain, and thinning bones. …..
Again, this is not a real person and many additional inquiries should be made as supplement suggestions could vary widely, even within these complaints, based on varying hormonal and or physiological factors. .
#health #wellness #nutrition #foodasmedicine#foodheals #wholefoodsupplements#wholepersonhealth #mediherb #standardprocess#apexenergetics #integrativemedicine#gutbrainconnection #healthygut#youarewhatyoueat #perimenopause#menopause #midlife #womenshealth

What is YOUR personal puzzle? and do you think Dr. Eric could find you a remedy?

Give him a call to find out!

Coby Dahlstrom (aka #mrsdrdahl)

for

Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts

Providing Chiropractic Care and Acupuncture in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)

~ follow us on
twitter: @SMHealingArts
facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
yelp: Santa Monica Healing Arts

TRUTH from our friend on huffpost the other day…

From www.huffingtonpost.com
original article here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christina-laughlin/its-time-to-stop-hating-y_b_9705732.html

 

“THE BLOG

04/18/2016 09:43 am ET | Updated 1 day ago

It’s Time to Stop Hating Your Body

What is your history with your body? What is your relationship with your physical presence in the world?

These are hard questions to answer. Because the answers usually hurt.

For most of us, if we’re honest, our relationship with our bodies is one of the most complicated and conflicted of our lives.

Many of us, when we think of our bodies, have a laundry list of complaints. From the way we look, to the way we move, to the illness we may carry. When we step back, then, and boil all those complaints down, our bodies become the source of two deep emotions: hate and fear.

“I hate the way my thighs rub when I walk.” “I am so afraid I will get cancer like my mother.” “I know boys don’t like bony girls.” “I hate getting old.”

We all have it. I know I sure have it. I can’t even fathom the number of times I haven’t gone to the beach because I didn’t want to get in a bathing suit, or that I’ve looked in the mirror, pulling my face this way and that, then letting out a big groan. Or how many times I’ve shamed my body, out loud, to others, cursing either the way it looks, or the way it’s changed as I’ve gotten older.

We all have that list of things that we say, to ourselves, and to others about the way we hate about our bodies. What we fear our bodies will do to us, to our lives. And we play out that dialogue, every single day, over and over.

Take a moment, and think to yourself, honestly about how many messages you send to your body every day that are negative. I know for me, it can be too many to count.

This has become a cultural way of life, our hating ourselves. And bonding with each other over the shared disdain of our physical presence. Then, we pass it on with each generation.

Think about what the world tells you about your body? What are the messages you have gotten about how to treat your physical self?

If you carry extra weight, the world says you’re lazy. If you are too thin, the world says you’re neurotic. If you have illness, the world says you’re weak. If you can’t bear children, you’re to be pitied. Yet, if you grind yourself into the ground through work, lack of sleep, “killer” workouts, the world applauds your efforts.

We, as a society, embrace our duality. The body is separate from “us.” It is something to be mastered, denied, beat up, overcome.

Think about exercise. We are supposed to “whip ourselves” into shape. “No pain, no gain.” If it isn’t hard, or painful, or torturous, it isn’t good enough. We stopped making exercise an enjoyable expression of movement and vitality, and made it into a form of punishment that is rewarded by an appearance obsessed society.

Make no mistake, we are obsessed with beauty. We will do most anything to achieve it. We have pills, and shots, and workouts, and lasers, and surgeries to try and fix those things about our bodies that aren’t good enough. And we tell ourselves that all the time; as I am, I am not good enough. So, we spend millions on trying to achieve our society’s ideal of perfect beauty. Because without it, we think we are too old, or too big, or too small, or too ugly to be loved. And while I look at myself in the mirror, contemplating how much acid it would actually take to peel off the years my face has earned, I have to look at what my body, our collective bodies, are hearing: “I hate you enough to inject you with toxins, to burn you, to cut you, because you aren’t good enough and it’s making me miserable.”

We hate our bodies for aging in a world consumed by youth, and yet we are terrified of dying. We curse our skin for sagging, our backs for aching, our eyesight for growing dim… all while popping vitamins and tonics trying to allay our fears of showing and feeling our age. We refuse to see that we can’t not die and not grow old at the same time.

What about sex? What words come out of our mouths about our bodies and their sexuality? Usually, that we aren’t desirable as we are. We will be, when we lose those ten pounds, or get waxed, or tone up our ass. Because nobody’s going to want to see thisnaked. But we forget that we are living, dynamic beings who don’t just want to have sex with each other because of how we look. OK, maybe sometimes. But when we are in a grounded, honest space, we want to have sex with each other because of how we feel, and how we feel with that other person. Sex is a union, a gift of sharing all of who you are with someone else, not just the perfect parts. Because perfect is boring. Messy is chaotic beauty at its best. It’s not the perfect push up bra, or the gap between your thighs, or the world’s longest erection. It’s your messy, human, divine self, and that’s beautiful.

We have come by these views honestly, by way of social conditioning over great spans of history. Not just the obsession of what lies in the mirror, but also the message that the physical is our burden to bear. Most all patriarchal religious systems teach us that the body is something to be overcome. In Christianity, is it to overcome the desires of the flesh that lead us to evil. In Buddhism, it is to overcome the physical needs of the body that weaken our ability to meditate and hinder our transcendence.

Think of how often you refuse to listen to your body. Whether its message is about food, sleep, stress, pain… how often do you “push past” what your body is trying to tell you? How often do you ignore your own physical needs? And how often do you brag about it, or receive praise from others for doing so?

We are lost in the duality of ourselves. We need to recognize that our bodies are an integral part of our being. We cannot exist without them. And we cannot expect our body to carry us through life, while we beat it up, day after day, without breaking down.

In Andrew Harvey’s book, The Direct Path, he says “How can we not fear and despise the body that is the source of so much anxiety and distress?” It’s natural, given the messages we tell ourselves every day. So, we have to change the conversation. Both with ourselves, and with each other. It will be hard, feeling almost impossible at times. To rid ourselves, as Harvey states, of all the cultural, sexual, and religious assumptions that teach you physical self-contempt.

But we must. We must stop the self-contempt.

We must learn to be compassionate to our skin.

We must be respectful to our bones.

We must be grateful to our hearts.

We must be in love with our own smiles.

We must come to see our bodies just as we do our spirits; an incarnation of the Divine in this form, so that it can express itself.

We are uniquely, beautifully, strangely us. And we need to start loving each and every part. Even those parts we want to transform. Especially those parts we think make us unattractive, unworthy, unlovable. Lean into them. Love yourself anyway. And never let yourself hate your body again. Because, really, one day you will be without it. And then, we will all realize the beautiful gift that it was, each and every lump and bump.

So, just for today, love who you are. Just as you are. Because you are beautiful. Because you are strong. Because you are compassionate. Because you are worth loving.

Fall in love with yourself. There’s no more important person on the planet for you to be in love with.

—-
If you’re struggling with an eating disorder, call the National Eating Disorder Association hotline at 1-800-931-2237.

original post here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christina-laughlin/its-time-to-stop-hating-y_b_9705732.html

Happy Chinese New Year! 2017 year of the Rooster…

______________

by

FullSizeRender-1

That one time we accidentally had a rooster at the Dahlstrom suburban farm. “Oedipus,” we called him!

John Copeland
Rancho Olivos
2390 N. Refugio Rd.
Santa Ynez, CA 93460
www.ranchoolivos.com

_______________

for

Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts
Providing Integrated Alternative Medicine in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)
~ follow us on
twitter: @SMHealingArts
facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
pinterest: @SMHealingArts
yelp: Santa Monica Healing Arts

*MASTER TONIC* what it is and why it’s so good for you {Nature’s “flu shot”}

Flu Season is upon us and so it is time…14492609_1126158860800502_749872313009883470_n

I talk about “Master Tonic” every season.  And inevitably, every season, there are several friends, followers, or patients that ask me, “what is it that again?” and “wait, what exactly is in it?”

Basically, it is “nature’s flu shot” (although I hate saying that).  In my family, we try to avoid anything that will compromise our immune system; We skip out on copious antibiotics, prescription drugs, over the counter medicines, vaccinations, unhealthy food choices, etc as much as we can.  Rather we prefer to strengthen our immunity naturally.  And, we believe in “food as medicine.”  Whole food supplements, homeopathic remedies, herbs too, and tonics.  So, this tonic is a really great start to boost your seasonal immunity.  We always have it on hand in the fridge so at the first sign of a sniffle or sore throat?  Yep…a shot of the tonic. One or two of these a day and you’ll be good as new in a few. img_1942

Believe it or not, nature gives us exactly what we need, when we need it.  Local, seasonal food actually does more to prevent dis-ease than most of us know – these days anyway.  Our ancestors knew it.  Ancient traditional healers knew it.  And the extensive research of Dr. Weston Price* shows us it is so.  “Master Tonic” really is the best of the best as far as immune-boosting natural medicine is concerned.

So, this is MY version.  There are many, but this one suits me best. Here ya go:

MASTER TONIC:img_3323

  1. garlic
  2. ginger
  3. cayenne
  4. turmeric
  5. black pepper
  6. lemon juice
  7. apple cider vinegar (preferably Bragg’s but definitely a brand that is organic & contains “the mother”)
  8. maple syrup (preferably grade-B)
  9. honey (raw & local)
  10. cinnamon
  11. onion

Preferably all organic, all raw, and all fresh.  Grated and then blended with all the pulp remaining.  If you only have powder or flakes or whatever that’s ok too, but raw organic is the BEST.

img_7107

Coconut Curry Butternut Squash Soup from the other night. Not ALL of the Master Tonic ingredients, but many!

Folks ask “how much of each?”  I always respond with “as much as you can tolerate.”  It should be as spicy as you can possibly make it without blowing your head off.  It will kinda taste like a sweet-and-spicy Thai chili sauce.  In fact, it is so easy to use this in soup or sauce recipes to make delicious seasonal family dinners while keeping everyone healthy!  Add even SOME of these ingredients to your regular diet and meals to boost your wellness.  If you are extremely sensitive to spicy, follow the “shot” with a “chaser” of rice, almond, or coconut milk (must be non dairy to prevent excess phlegm and inflammation).  It is much the same as how you would cool your palate with Thai tea or coconut in your curry at your fave Thai or Indian restaurant, or Horchata after spicy Mexican food.

OK, so I’m sure you are wondering how these various food items can be so miraculous.  Delicious, sure, but curative?  What exactly makes this food into medicine?  For that, follow along – here’s a little light reading…

Garlic:unknown

Historically, garlic has been known to combat sickness (and not just ward off Vampires! although you can see how that myth is seasonally appropriate as, inexplicably, illness does rise in October).  Garlic contains a compound called Allicin that has many medicinal properties.  It also contains significant amounts of  Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, & Manganese. It is good for combating high blood pressure/hypertension, and likewise improves cholesterol thus lowering one’s likelihood of heart disease.  It’s strong concentration of antioxidants prevents sickness as well as preventing Alzheimer’s and dementia. Garlic is anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and anti-viral.  Finally, it’s allyl sulfides hep prevent cancer.

for more info, go here: https://authoritynutrition.com/11-proven-health-benefits-of-garlic

or here: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=60

Ginger:unknown-1

Not just for nausea (although it does do wonders for nausea when you’re preggers!- fresh only though – no supplements!). Ginger is shocked full of nutrients and bio active compounds that are super healthy for your body and brain.  Ginger helps with digestion, reduces nausea, and most importantly, fights the flu.  It’s natural oil, gingerol, is a bioactive compound responsible for anti inflammatory and antioxidant effects.  Because it is anti-inflammatory, ginger reduces muscle pain and soreness.  The root also boasts anti-diabetic properties by lowering sugar, helps to prevent heart disease, and reduces menstrual pain, as well as lowers cholesterol.  Studies show that gingerol has even been found to help prevent cancer.

for more info, go here: https://authoritynutrition.com/11-proven-benefits-of-ginger/

Cayenne:unknown-3

Too hot! Hot Damn! Call the Police & the Fireman!  But really, Cayenne is a powerhouse of health.  Full of Capsaicin, the question really is, what CAN’T it fix?

Firstly we’ll start with our gut.  Capsaicin increases the digestive fluids, starting with saliva, and down on into the stomach.  By doing so, it fights bacteria that could cause an intestinal infection.  It also helps with digestions and aids in fighting diarrhea that is caused by a bacterial infection (and God knows flu diarrhea can be nasty). Capsaicin acts as an antioxidant, protecting the cells from free radicals.  Plus, Cayenne is highly effective in cancer prevention. Capsaicin is a mucus thinner, and can help get mucus out of the lungs (very good when you have the flu!). It is thought to strengthen lung tissues and help to prevent emphysema.

Cayenne is full of beta carotene and antioxidants that support your immune system.  It raises your body temperature and thus increases the activity 0f the immune system. And, it is full of Vitamin C to further prevent infection.
Cayenne also contains Vitamin A and Vitamin E, both antioxidants that reduce inflammation. Because of its anti-inflammatory qualities, the spice prevents allergies and their associated symptoms (which are similar to flu symptoms right?). It has anti-fungal properties that can prevent systemic Candida and thusly prevent joint pain, further digestive disorders, and a weakened immune system.
Lastly, Cayenne boosts metabolism, improves energy levels, aids in weight loss, can help with eczema, repairs damaged skin, and reduces migraine pain (flu headaches are the worst!).
for more info, go here: https://draxe.com/cayenne-pepper-benefits/

or here: http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/tc/capsaicin-topic-overview

Turmeric:unknown-2

I know!  All the rage now!  Everyone is talking and tweeting about the anti-inflammatory benefits of turmeric. The “Golden Latte” is on the tip of many westside hipster tongues. Well, it is true. This spice has amazing anti-inflammatory qualities! Here’s the scoop:

Turmeric is what turns curry yellow and has been used in India for thousands of years. The thing that makes it medicinal is it’s compounds called curcuminoids, most notably, curcumin; The famed antioxidant with anti-inflammatory effects.  But what is MOST important and many folks don’t know, is that you MUST consume turmeric in conjunction with black pepper.  The black pepper contains piperine, which increases your blood’s ability to absorb the curcumin by as much as 2000%!  Also important, and why the ‘golden milk’ works well as a delivery system, is that turmeric is fat soluble, so it should be consumed with a fatty meal.

160608coachturmeric2What else is cool about this hip spice? It helps to improve brain function and lowers the risk of brain dis-eases such as depression and Alzheimer’s.  How? not to get too sciency, but many brain disorders are linked to decreased levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF).  Curcumin can increase levels of BDNF, therefore delaying and/or even reversing age related decrease in brain function as well as common brain diseases.  Curcumin can cross the blood-brain barrier, which is the reason that it is believed to aid dramatically in the prevention and reverse of Alzheimer’s disease. One of the characteristics of this vastly unstudied disease, is a buildup of proteins called Amyloid plaques.  Studies show that curcumin is helpful in the removal of these plaques. Oxidative damage and inflammation play a major role as well, both of which are beneficially affected by the curcumin in Turmeric. As it aids in the brain, curcumin is also thought to just plain make you smarter.

Oh and btw, as it is anti-inflammatory, curcumin helps with arthritis, even rheumatoid arthritis.

As you may or may not realize, inflammation is your body’s way of insulating itself when it is damaged, but it also causes pain. So why is turmeric good for preventing/recovering from the flu? um, decreases your inflammation, duh.

*Oh and on a healthy side note*…You may have heard about the recent recall.  If not, now you do. Elevated levels of lead have been found in six brands of powdered turmeric, all from the parent company Gel Spice: Spice Select, Market Pantry, Gel (2 lots), Clear Value, Lieber’s, and Spice Supreme (For more on that go here: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2016/08/six-brands-of-turmeric-added-to-recall-for-excessive-lead/#.WA7e-qOZPR1). Suffice to say be aware of your product and from whom you are purchasing.

For more info re the benefits of turmeric, you can go here: https://authoritynutrition.com/top-10-evidence-based-health-benefits-of-turmeric/

Black Pepper:images

So, above we mentioned how this spice works in conjunction with turmeric, but it also has many medicinal qualities of it’s very own and is used frequently in Ayurvedic medicine. In addition to the afore mentioned piperine, black pepper also contains iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, chromium, Vitamin A, and Vitamin C.

As with it’s bestie curcumin, piperine increases the bioavailability of many other nutrients namely Vitamin A, C, selenium, and beta carotene. It also helps to stimulate digestion and as a result can help prevent or colic, bloating, indigestion, flatulence, and constipation (all horrid flu symptoms). It’s antibacterial qualities prevent intestinal bacteria and aid in a healthy gut biome. Studies show that piperine speeds up your metabolism, suppresses fat accumulation in the body, promotes urination, and perspiration, and as a result aids in detox as it helps to remove toxins from the body (just sweat it out).

for more info, go here: http://www.top10homeremedies.com/kitchen-ingredients/top-10-health-benefits-black-pepper.html

Lemon Juice:

No…not lemonade, not “from concentrate,” not reconstituted, and most certainly not from a plastic lemon-shaped bottle! Raw, fresh-squeezed and organic if you please.

First off, Lemons are packed with vitamin C, and not just a little, they have 187% of the daily value, so super-duper for your immune system! Together with the flavonoid glycosides esperetin and naringenin, free radicals haven’t much of a fighting chance.

Additionally, lemons contain thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, iron, magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, and copper, folate, and potassium. The more healthy minerals in you, the healthier you are. Lemons contain Vitamin A, and flavonoid anti-oxidants like alpha, and B-carotenes, B-cryptoxanthin, zea-xanthin and lutein all of which are antioxidants.

lemon2-min

Surprisingly, lemons are NOT acidic (weird I know!) they are actually alkaline and work to balance your body’s pH. Most sickness cannot exist in an alkaline environment, notably cancer. Their alkaline nature relieves the body of excess acid, reducing pain in the joints, muscles, and fibrous tissue.

“There is often misunderstanding of lemon’s pH outside the body versus inside the body.  Let’s get this straight and expound on 10 benefits of regularly taking lemon juice with warm water (note: NOT equal to lemonade!)

Outside the body, lemon juice is acidic (pH is below 7).  This is a non-issue. Everyone knows this.  It’s a citrus fruit.

Inside the body however, when lemon juice has been fully metabolized and its minerals are dissociated in the bloodstream, its effect is alkalizing and therefore raises the pH of body tissue (pH above 7 is alkaline).  Please notice the difference.” (http://www.vitalitylink.com/article-holistic-health-2055-lemon-juice-acidic-alkaline-body-water)

And one last interesting fact.  We all know that staying hydrated when you’re sick is essential (especially when you’re loosing bodily fluids literally in all directions!).  Interestingly enough, “a small amount of lemon juice will quench thirst more effectively than many times the amount of water. Experienced travelers declare that when they add lemon juice to ordinary drinking water, in various localities, it acts as an antiseptic and prevents illness due to allergy to different water supplies.” (http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/health/physical-health/hidden-health-secrets-of-lemons.aspx?p=9)

for more info, go here:

http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/10-Reasons-Lemon-Juice-Good-You-14860617

or here: http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/health/physical-health/hidden-health-secrets-of-lemons.aspx

or here: http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/lemon.html

or here: http://www.vitalitylink.com/article-holistic-health-2055-lemon-juice-acidic-alkaline-body-water

Apple Cider Vinegar:

To start, let’s quote Patricia and Paul Bragg from their book “Apple Cider Vinegar Miracle Health System:”unknown-4

“Research worldwide supports and commends what Hippocrates (the father of medicine) found and treated his patients with in 400 B.C. He discovered that natural, undistilled Apple Cider Vinegar (or ACV)* is a powerful cleansing and healing elixir, “a naturally occurring antibiotic and antiseptic that fights germs and bacteria” for a healthier, stronger, longer life!

The versatility of ACV as a powerful body cleansing agent is legendary. It’s been traced to Egyptian urns as far back as 3000 B.C. The Babylonians used it as a condiment and preservative, while Julius Caesar’s army used ACV tonic to stay healthy and fight off disease. The Greeks and Romans kept vinegar vessels for healing and flavoring. It was used in Biblical times as an antiseptic and a healing agent and is mentioned in the Bible. In Paris during the Middle Ages, it was sold from barrels by street vendors as a body deodorant, healing tonic and a health vinegar drink.

Even Christopher Columbus and his crew on his voyage to discover America in 1492 had their vinegar barrels for prevention of scurvy as did the soldiers in the American Civil War. For centuries in Japan, the feared Samurai warriors drank it for strength and power. ACV has been used for thousands of years not only for health reasons, but also as a cleansing agent to remove bacteria, germs, odors, and even stains and spots.”

purchase the book here: http://bragg.com/zencart/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=8&products_id=22

But really, ACV is redonk good for you.

Starting with its Antimicrobial properties…yes! it is good for CLEANING. Your house, your hair, your face, but more importantly, your CELLS. The organic acid (primarily acetic acid, passes into your cell membranes to kill bacteria lurking there. And um…Buh Bye bacterial infection! Naturally, foods that have been fermented with ACV have a powerhouse of antimicrobial organic acids (amino acids) including not only acetic but also lactic, ascorbic, citric (no not from citrus), malic, propionic, succinct, and tartaric (not found in steak tartar, snigger).  “One study found acetic acid to be lethal to even E. coli O157:H7, while other research has shown substances such as acetic acid, lemon juice, or a combination of lemon juice and vinegar to be effective against salmonella.”

You might have guessed that like many of the “Master Tonic” ingredients, ACV has its own load of antioxidants, some of which include catechin, epicatechin, and gallic, caffein, and chlorogenic acids.

And it helps with heartburn and acid reflux (both common with the flu right?) Did you know that acid reflux ironically is a result of TOO LITTLE acid in your stomach? Adding all the above to your belly will relieve all that.

Be sure to get an ACV that is organic and be CERTAIN that is has the “Mother” in it. yes. that gooey globular slimy thingy in the bottom. That is SOOOPER good for you. it is an amino-acid based substance made from acetic acid bacteria.  That stuff helps reduce muscle damage caused by inflammation. Weird huh?

for more information go here: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/14/vinegar-health-properties.aspx

Maple Syrup:unknown

Maple syrup is DELICIOUS! But, believe it or not, is also incredibly nutritious! Of course, we are not talking about Mrs. Butterworths, okay? I mean 100% pure maple syrup…you know, like from a Maple tree? (Didn’t ya’ll read the “Little House on the Prairie” books? remember Pa gets it from the ACTUAL trees in the forest in Vermont?) As for nutrients, it contains water, protein, fat, carbohydrates, and sugars. Wait, protein? yes, protein.  And the minerals, tho! Full of calciumironmagnesiumphosphorus sodiumpotassium, and zinc. As well as vitamins! thiamin, riboflavinniacin, and B6.

You guys know about antioxidants obvs, so I won’t get into it AGAIN, but suffice to say that maple syrup, surprisingly, has antioxidant properties that are highly important for the body. Primarily it is the Manganese present in the maple syrup that supplies superoxide dismutase (an oxidative enzyme) to help rid the mitochondria of free radicals that occur during normal metabolic function.

Maple syrup contains not only Manganese but Zinc as well, both of which help boost the number of white blood cells in to support the Immune System and help fight infection.images-1

Again I must insist on 100% pure organic. And preferably Grade B if possible, as it is less filtered/refined and will contain many more of its natural goodness (As a rule, it is always best to go for the less processed of anything really).  A couple of easy to find brands that I trust are Spring Tree (which can be found at most organic grocers or coops), Simple truth (if you shop at Ralph’s – although your money does go the Koch Bros when you shop there so there’s that), or Trader Joe’s has a great one or two and maybe sometimes even the Grade B!

for more info, go here:

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/maple-syrup.html https://draxe.com/maple-syrup-nutrition/

Raw (local) Honey:raw-local-honey-is-the-cure-for-seasonal-allergies

The ancient liquid gold! No, really!

“Health benefits of consuming honey have been documented in early Greek, Roman, Vedic, and Islamic texts and the healing qualities of honey were referred to by philosophers and scientists all the way back to ancient times, such as Aristotle (384 – 322 BC) and Aristoxenus (320 BC).”(http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264667.php)

In fact, bee barf packs an arsenal of antioxidants including disease-fighting antioxidant flavonoids pinocembrin, pinostrobin and chrysin, all polyphenols that significantly boost one’s immune system. “Raw honey contains 22 amino acids, 27 minerals and 5,000 enzymes. Minerals include ironzincpotassiumcalciumphosphorousmagnesium and selenium. Vitamins found in honey include vitamin B6, thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and niacin. In addition, the nutraceuticals contained in honey help neutralize damaging free radical activity.” (https://draxe.com/the-many-health-benefits-of-raw-honey/)

It is exceptionally good for sleep (god knows we all need SLEEP when we have the horrid flu!) and if you don’t get worn down in the first place, then you won’t get sick. To quote Dr. Axe…

“Raw honey promotes restorative sleep in two ways. By consuming honey before bedtime, it restocks the liver’s glycogen supply and prevents the brain from triggering a crisis search for fuel, which can wake you up. Secondly, eating raw honey fosters the release of melatonin in the brain by creating a small spike in insulin levels, which stimulates the release of tryptophan in the brain. Tryptophan converts to serotonin, which is then converted to melatonin.

Melatonin also boosts immunity and helps rebuild tissue during periods of rest.”

Did you know that honey actually helps with seasonal allergies? Yes! Because the raw honey is made from the very blossoms that cause you to sneeze and have itchy watery eyes. The delicious delivery system provides your body with a sort of inoculation against your local seasonal pollen. Of course, it’s gotta be from a local hive or the pollen won’t have it’s effect, and also of course, the honey must be raw in order to retain traces of the offending flora and fauna.

And finally, honey is a miraculous cough suppressant. “Raw honey has been shown to be as effective in treating coughs as over-the-counter commercial cough syrups. Increasing scientific evidence shows that a single dose of honey can reduce mucus secretion and coughs. In one study, honey was just as effective as diphenhydramine and dextromethorphan, common ingredients found in over-the counter cough medicines.”images

In fact, “The World Health Organization (WHO) and American Academy of Pediatrics recommend honey as a natural cough remedy.

A 2007 study by Penn State College of Medicine suggested that honey reduced nighttime coughing and improved sleep quality in children with upper respiratory infection better than the cough medicine dextromethorphan or no treatment

(http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264667.php)

for more info, go here: https://draxe.com/the-many-health-benefits-of-raw-honey/

or here: http://therawnakedtruth.me/raw-local-honey-natures-cure-for-seasonal-allergies/

or here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264667.php

Cinnamon:unknown-5

OK, so cinnamon is another one that is super good for you in so many ways! To start, it can lower bad cholesterol, help treat type 2 diabetes, is used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, can help manage Polycystic ovarian syndrome, and has anti-carcinogenic properties (prevents cancer). Traditional  Chinese medicine and Ayurveda have depended on cinnamon for thousands of years to treat colds, indigestion, and to promote higher brain function, lessen cramps, and for it’s anti-clotting properties. Cinnamon is believed to improve energy, vitality and circulation.

You see cinnamon is made of what is called cinnamaldehyde, which is why it has antifungal and antibacterial properties.  As well, it has a very high concentration of antioxidants (there’s that word again!), which reduct inflammation and protect the body from free radical damage.

It is important to note that there are several kinds of cinnamon; Know that *Ceylon cinnamon* is the one to look for. Don’t fall for Cassia or Chinese cinnamon (ironic, I know, considering the recommendation from Chinese Medicine right? be wary…). Also, know that too much cinnamon may cause digestive issues as the spice apparently cannot tell the difference, once in your gut, between good and bad bacteria. It is advised that if you are using copious amounts of cinnamon (please no more than 6 grams daily!), you should add probiotics to your diet to encourage the good gut flora (but you know you should be doing this anyway, right?).

summarized from the following: http://www.organicauthority.com/health/11-health-benefits-of-cinnamon.html#

for more info, go here: https://authoritynutrition.com/10-proven-benefits-of-cinnamon/

Onion:images-3

Where to start? These epic orbs are like little bombs of health! Along with all of the items on this Master Tonic list, onions have been used for thousands of years by almost all cultures and societies. They are indomitable!

Ok, why? well, onions have significant amounts of Vitamin C and B6, iron, folate, potassium, and Manganese, as well as the phytochemicals known as allium and allyl disulphide (which become allicin) that are the powerhouse of the bulb. Onions are anti-inflammatory, cancer-fighting, diabetes-preventing, blood pressure lowering, and coronary artery disease preventing.

Significant amounts of polyphenols (another phytochemical in onions) and an antioxidant flavonoid called quercetin account for the reputation onions have for disease prevention. Quercitin has proven anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic functions, helps prevent histamine release, and prevents the inflammatory processes associated with asthma. Polyphenols also play an important role as a prebiotic, increasing the ratio of beneficial bacteria in your gut, which is important for health, weight management, and disease prevention. Prebiotics are indigestible to you, but they help nourish beneficial bacteria in your body. These beneficial bacteria in turn assist with digestion and absorption of your food, and play a significant role in your immune function.

Luckily, cooking onions in soup doesn’t diminish their quercetin value – it simply transfers to the broth. The flavonoids in onions are more concentrated in the outer layers, so discard as little as possible. (As you can imagine, French onion soup is shock full of the good stuff!)

the above is summarized from: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/01/04/health-benefits-onions.aspx

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/onion.html

—————————————-

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Pumpkin soup by Dr. Eric the other night. You’d be surprised how many of the tonic ingredients are in here. we LOVE seasonal remedies!

Blah Blah Blah Blah….Wait, did you finish? You read it all? Really? No skimming? Golly, that was quick. I mean, it took me, like, two months to write it! All those summaries of each ingredient, jeez! tedious! But super important. for reals.

So now do you see why Master Tonic is the real deal? Why it is so EPIC for you? Did you notice a recurring theme? (*hint: antioxidants! anti-inflammatory! immune-support!*) I sure hope I have been convincing. Because we’ve got to give our immune system a good, running start! We are now in the thick of flu season and no one wants to be under the weather for the holidays. At the very least, I know my rantings have influenced the habits of a few of my neighbors, lol. In fact, Dr. Eric was home with the flu just this weekend (you bet I was feeding him shots of this stuff)! And right on cue, our neighbors Tim & Vicki say, “Master Tonic!” I LOVE that. It makes me so happy. Because really, food IS MEDICINE. And sickness can be prevented if we are knowledgable and careful in our food choices.  As you can see from some of the photos here, use it in your cooking too! An easy way to make your food deliciously seasoned, AND super healthy. Combined with your homemade bone broth/chicken stock, you are good to go!

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“Faux-Pho” from last month – full of many of the master tonic ingredients! and made with homemade bone broth too. an immune support powerhouse!

Hey, I sure hope you guys don’t get sick. And if you do, hope this helps!

Big hugs,

Coby Dahlstrom (aka #mrsdrdahl)

for

Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts

Providing Chiropractic Care and Acupuncture in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)

~ follow us on
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facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
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*for more info re Dr. Price go here: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weston_Price)

One Vote that you can feel really GOOD about!

“Best of the Westside 2016” Results are in…Winner!

That’s right. Dr. Eric has been included in The Argonaut Magazine’s “Best of the Westside” AGAIN this year – for the 4th year in a row! In 2016 we have a trifecta!:

1st Place! Best Holistic Medicine Practice

2nd Place! Chiropractic

3rd Place! Acupuncture

Very special thanks to all of our friends & patients for your votes!

http://argonautnews.com/best-of-the-westside-2016-health-fitness-winners/best-16

Now come pay us a visit. 310.207.0222

Coby Dahlstrom
aka #mrsdrdahl
for
Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts
Providing Integrative Holistic Care in Santa Monica since 1999
(http://santamonicahealingarts.com). 
Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica)
or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)
~ follow us on1-3-1
twitter: @SMHealingArts
facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
pinterest: @SMHealingArts
yelp: Santa Monica Healing Arts

Ready for Fall? THIS!: seasonal butternut squash soup

#mrsdrdahl’s first sight of fall soup

Anyone else noticing that the air smells a little different? There is misty fog in the morning before work or school drop off. And at the end of the day, it’s a bit chilly? Yay FALL! (or what we know of it in LA anyway).

In Dr. Eric’s garden its fall too; the summer squash is ripening. In the last few weeks, he’s brought home several different varieties (pumpkins, patty pans, Lebanese zucchini, yellow summer squash, and butternut (my fave).

When the squash comes home, and you need a sweater in the evenings, it’s SOUP SEASON!

Oh, I made a yummy one the other night for our first dive in.  So yummy, in fact, that I got 40+ likes on instagram (@mrsdrdahl).  So I’m thinking that it might be worthy of a blog here on Dr. D’s website.  This soup is not only delicious, and nutritious, but easy!  Here it is:

mrsdrdahl’s First Sight of Fall Soup (Roasted Butternut Squash)

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A recent Sunday’s harvest from Dr. Eric’s garden

1 large whole organic butternut squash

2 Tbs organic butter (preferably Kerrygold Irish butter)

1 organic apple (preferably fuji or gala)

1 organic yellow onion (or maui)

2 bay leaves

1/4 tsp fresh thyme

1/4 tsp fresh terragon

1/4 tsp turmeric

1/4 tsp cinnamon

dash cayenne (or two or three)

2 C bone broth (preferably homemade) chicken (or veggie)

1 C filtered water

img_6501

Dr. Eric in his happy place

1 tsp sea salt

2 dashes white pepper (or three)

fresh ground black pepper to taste

squeeze of lemon

1/2 C organic milk (or almond, hemp, rice, goat, cream, etc)

seeds of the butternut squash

whole plain organic yogurt (goat or greek ok, or sour cream)

dash of paprika

Lucero Olive Oil’s Evoo Favolosa Extra Virgin Olive Oil (preferably)

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 375.
  2. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and hollow out the middle separating the seeds and setting them aside (do not throw out). Cover the inside surface of the exposed squash meat with olive oil then place insides up on a baking sheet covered in parchment. Add the cleaned squash seeds to the lined baking pan, and place all in the oven to roast.
  3. Be sure to check on the seeds after about 15-20 minutes and take them out or they will burn! When cooler, toss seeds in Lucero’s Favolosa Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) & sea salt. Set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, return the squash to the oven. Roast for approx 1 hour (total) until your house smells amazing, it is slightly browned on top, & it is soft all the way through when tested with a fork. Remove from oven and let cool.
  5. While the squash is cooking, dice both your onion (skinned) and apple (skin on) and sautee them in a saucepan with 2 Tbs butter (preferably Kerrygold Irish butter) and the bay leaves until apple and onions are clear and soft. Then add spices.
  6. When the squash has cooled considerably, using a spoon, scrape the meat from the skin, discard skin.
  7. Back in the pan, add the broth, water, roasted squash meat, salt & both peppers. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer, stirring occassionally for approximately 15 minutes to blend the flavors. Remove from heat and stir in your “milk” of choice. Squeeze in the fresh lemon.

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    immersion blender – the best!

  8. Using a blender (I prefer an immersion blender as it doesn’t require moving the soup from the sauce pan), puree the soup until it is the desired consistency (I prefer it rather lumpy).
  9. Serve garnished with a dollop of yogurt & the reserved roasted butternut squash seeds.  If you want it extra pretty, I’d also add a dash of paprika, and drizzle of the delicious Lucero Favolosa EVOO (not pictured above).
  10. Enjoy!

So, it takes a while, but still it’s easy work. And totally worth it! My kids and hubs both scarfed it down! The soup, and the side -salad of organic kale tossed in another couple of my faves Lucero’s Persian Lime EVOO, and their Mission Fig Balsamic Vinegar, & topped with dried cranberries (as pictured above).

PLUS, as I’ve mentioned before and as you surely know from Dr. Eric, seasonal, local food is ridiculously good for you.  Nature knows best of course, and she provides exactly the things you need when you need them. Wondering what on God’s Green Earth could be so great about butternut squash? well here’s a few things*:

  1. Heart Health. Full of potassium, it helps counteract the effects of sodium and decreases your blood pressure to prevent things like heart attack and stroke.
  2. Helps keep you regular. Full of fiber, it helps with digestion and helps maintain a healthy digestive track with good gut bacteria (and we know how much we are learning lately about THAT!).
  3. Healthy Eyesight. Full of Vitamin A, as well as lutein & zeaxanthin both antioxidants, the squash is great for your eyes.
  4. Healthy Bones. Full of manganese, Vitamin C, Iron folate, & Zinc, it helps maintain calcium absorption, mineral density, & production of collagen, all for healthy bone structure and protection against osteoperosis.
  5. Healty Skin. Full of Vitamin C, it helps prevent dryness and wrinkles and thus keeps you looking youthful! um, yay?!
  6. Healthy Immune Function. Again, with the Vitamin C – we all know that it is like, the best to help you fight infection.
  7. Reduces Inlammation. Yessir! the winner. Inflammation is the cause of most of our pain and disease. B-squash has the antioxidant beta-cryptoxanthin which reduces that shite. Need I list how studies show…reduces inflammation-related disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, regular arthritis, cancer…& all those yuckies?
  8. Aids in weight loss – what?! less than 100 calories, 26 carbs, and almost no fat. Great for filling you up without weighing you down.

*The above list of benefits is summarized from the following: http://www.organicauthority.com/8-incredible-nutrition-and-health-benefits-of-butternut-squash/

e70cc678b3bb11e381b312310118f31f_5

homemade bone broth

So, those are some freakin’ great reasons to eat it.  That, and that it is delicious!  And, we haven’t even looked at the health benefits of all the other awesome ingredients like …. say…

bone broth (see a previous SMHA blog here: http://santamonicahealingarts.com/?p=800), or onions, cayenne, or turmeric (all the rage now re anti-inflammation!)… or how the black pepper helps your body absorb the amaze turmeric…or how lemon juice is alkaline which helps starve and prevent cancer…or paprika, or sea salt, oh and helloooooo OLIVE OIL? the list goes on.

What your body needs, nature provides.  And, right WHEN you need it.  To prevent FLU season (no FLU shots needed thank you very much).  The best bet is #foodasmedicine.  Ask Dr. Eric.  There’s a reason why you crave what you do, when you do. Trust your insticts.  And stay well.

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me in my favorite fall sweater on soup day! The Darcy Grandpa Cardigan in Latte from www.amateursstudio.com

Enjoy!

Coby Dahlstrom (aka #mrsdrdahl)

for

Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts

Providing Chiropractic Care and Acupuncture in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)

~ follow us on
twitter: @SMHealingArts
facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
yelp: Santa Monica Healing Arts

 

PS: For fun & just in case you might be interested, I’ve used the same inspiring base recipe for years for all of my butternut squash soup variations…you can find it here: http://www.chowhound.com/recipes/roasted-butternut-squash-soup-30466

PPS: I swear I don’t work for Lucero Olive Oil, lol.  But I do LOVE their amazing healthy gourment products! Ridiculous good. Every time our family makes the trip up to visit Dr. Eric’s mom or sister in Nor Cal, we stop off and visit the beautiful tasting room in Corning.  And we order them online a lot too.  They have great sales and super gift sets which are great for all our foodie friends and stocking stuffers. Just because it was so tasty with our butternut squash seeds, here’s the link for the Favolosa EVOO, but be sure to check out the Persian Lime as well (I think it’s even on sale right now!), and all the super balsamic vinegars! http://www.lucerooliveoil.com/single-variety-evoo/favolosa-extra-virgin-olive-oil.html

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lateral learning – why a school garden is so important!

PPPS: Last year, about this time, Dr. Eric sponsored the most amazing thing at the Kentwood School Garden for the 3rd graders and their school-grown butternut squash.  It was truly one of the highlights of my health/food/garden/mom life! Kids need school gardens – for so many reasons. Need a little inspiration?  Check out my last year’s October blog “The Whole Kit and Caboodle for Kentwood” here: http://santamonicahealingarts.com/?p=1156

 

 

 

 

OILY FOOD an excerpt from “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” by Kingsolver/Hopp

Following is an exerpt written by Stephen L. Hopp for Animal, Vegetable, Miracle – A Year of Food Life 51PfhTR2k-Lby Kingsolver/Hopp

Oily Food

“Americans put almost as much fossil fuel into our regrigerators as our cars. We’re consuming about 400 gallons of oil a year per citizen – about 17 percent of our nation’s energy use- for agriculture, a close second to our vehicular use. Tractors, combines, harvesters, irrigation, sprayers, tillers, balers, and other equipment all use petroleum. Even bigger gas guzzlers on the farm are not the machines, but the so-called inputs. Synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides use oil and natural gas as their starting materials, and in their manufacturing. More than a quarter of all farming energy goes into synthetic fertilizers.

But getting the crop from seed to harvest takes only one-fifth of the total oil used for our food. The lion’s share is consumed during the trip from the farm to your plate. Each food item in a typical U.S. meal has traveled an average of 1,500 miles. In addition to direct transport, other fuel-thristy steps include processsing (drying, milling, cutting, sorting, baking), packaging, wherehousing, and refrigeration. Energy calories consumed by production, packaging, and shipping far outweigh the energy calories we receive from the food.

A quick way to improve food-related fuel economy would be to buy a quart of motor oil and drink it. More palatable options are available. If every U.S. citizen ate just one meal a week (any meal) composed of locally and organically raised meats and produce, we would reduce our country’s oil consumption by over 1.1 million barrels of oil every week. That’s not gallons, but barrels. Small changes in buying habits can make big differences. Becoming a less energy-dependent nation may just need to start with a good breakfast.” images-3

——-

Taken from the dust jacket back cover: “Author Barbara Kingsolver and her family abandoned the industrial food pipeline to live a rural life- vowing that, for one year, they’d only buy food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it.  Part memoire, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is an enthralling narrative that will open our eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.”

If you are interested in reading this fantastic book (and we suggest you do), you can find it here:

https://www.amazon.com/Animal-Vegetable-Miracle-Year-Food/dp/0060852569/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1471453919&sr=8-1&keywords=animal+vegetable+miracle

~ Coby Dahlstromimages-2

for
Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts
Providing Integrated Alternative Medicine in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)images-1
~ follow us on
twitter: @SMHealingArts
facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
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yelp: Santa Monica Healing Arts

HOME GROWN an excerpt from “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” by Kingsolver/Hopp

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle – A Year of Food Life51PfhTR2k-L

THIS BOOK is a must read.

what is it about? Food as Medicine.

Taken from the dust jacket back cover: “Author Barbara Kingsolver and her family abandoned the industrial food pipeline to live a rural life- vowing that, for one year, they’d only buy food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it.  Part memoire, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is an enthralling narrative that will open our eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.”

Just for fun. here’s one excerpt, written by Steven L. Hopp, the author’s husband who in addition to being an author of essays, is also a teacher of environmentl studies at Emory and Henry College. It addresses a concern MANY of our Patients and online followers have regarding growing your own food…

“HOME GROWN

Oh sure, Barbara Kingsolver has forty acres and Mule (a donkey, actually). But how can someone like me participate in the spirit of growing things, when my apartment overlooks the freeway and other people’s windows?

How big is that spare bedroom? Just kidding. But even for people who live in urban areas (more than half our population), directly contributing to local food economies isn’t out of the question. Container gardening on porches, balconies, back steps, or even a sunny window can yield a surprising amount of sprouts, herbs, and even produce. Just a few tomato plants in big flowerpots can be surprisingly productive.

If you have any yard at all, part of it can become a garden. You can spade up the sunnniest part of it for seasonal vegetables, or go for the more understated option of using perennial edibles in your landscaping. Fruit, nut, citrus, or berry plants come in many attractive forms, with appropriate choices for every region of the country.

If you’re not a landowner, you can still find in most urban areas some opportunity to garden. Many community-supported agriculture (CSA) operations allow or even require subscribers to participate on their farms; they might even offer a work-for-food arrangement. Most urban areas also host community gardens, using various organizational protocols – a widespread practice in European cities that has taken root here. Some rent garden spaces to the first comers; others provide free space for neighborhood residents. Some are organized and run by volunteers for some specific goal, such as supplying food to a local school, while others accomodate special needs of disabled participants or at-risk youth. Information and locations can be found at the American Community Garden Association site: www.communitygarden.org.”

If you are interested in reading this fantastic book (and we suggest you do), you can find it here:

https://www.amazon.com/Animal-Vegetable-Miracle-Year-Food/dp/0060852569/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1471453919&sr=8-1&keywords=animal+vegetable+miracle

~ Coby Dahlstrom

for
Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts

 

Providing Integrated Alternative Medicine in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)
~ follow us on
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facebook: “Santa Monica Healing Arts”
instagram: @mrsdrdahl
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Laissez les bons temps rouler! Lent starts tomorrow…

By John Copeland for SMHA

th-1Today is known as Fat Tuesday, Shrove Tuesday and Carnival, all traditional names for the day before Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent. It is more commonly known as Mardi Gras, which is simply Fat Tuesday in French. No matter what its name is, the day before Ash Wednesday has long been a time for eating and merry making.

 Fat Tuesday is a Christian holiday, is also known as Carnival and is celebrated in many countries around the world, mainly those with large Roman Catholic populations, on the day before the religious season of Lent begins.  Today, Brazil, Venice and New Orleans play host to the holiday’s most famous public festivities, drawing thousands of tourists and revelers every year.

Ash Wednesday, which is tomorrow, marks the start of Lent, the six weeks directly before Easter.  The forty day Lenten period is observed by many Christians with fasting and penitential practices. Traditionally during Lent, no parties or other celebrations are held, and people refrain from eating rich foods, such as meat, dairy, fats and sugar. These forty days of Lent, recall the Gospel accounts of the forty days Jesus spent in the wilderness, serve to mark an annual time of turning.

 Traditionally, in the days leading up to Lent, merrymakers would binge on all the meat, eggs, milk and cheese that remained in their homes.  Fat Tuesday was traditionally a time to use up all the milk, butter and eggs left in the kitchen. These ingredients were often used to make pancakes, which is why in spots of the globe it is still called Pancake Day.th-6


Across the globe, pre-Lenten festivals continue to be held in many countries with significant Roman Catholic populations. Brazil’s weeklong Carnival festivities feature a vibrant amalgam of European, African and native traditions.  In Canada, Quebec City hosts the giant Quebec Winter Carnival.  In Italy, tourists flock to Venice’s Carnevale, which dates back to the 13th century and is famous for its masquerade balls.  Known as Karneval, Fastnacht or Fasching, the German celebration includes parades, costume balls and a tradition that empowers women to cut off men’s ties.

According to historians, Mardi Gras actually dates back thousands of years and is related to pagan celebrations of spring and fertility, including the raucous Roman festival of Lupercalia. When Christianity became nascent in Rome, the early church leaders incorporated many of the  popular pagan traditions, an easier task than abolishing them altogether, as a prelude to Lent, the 40 days of penance between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday.th

The word Carnival is actually rooted in these celebrations.  Although its origin is disputed, as are many things in the past, folk etymologies exist which state that Carnival comes from the Late Latin expression “carne vale,” which means “farewell to meat”, signifying that these are the last days when one could eat meat before the fasting of Lent. The word “carne” can also be translated as “flesh,” suggesting “carne vale” as “a farewell to the flesh,” a meaning enthusiastically embraced by some Carnival celebrants who encourage embracing the carefree nature of the festival.

Some of the best-known traditions, including carnival parades and masquerade ball masquerading, were first recorded in medieval Italy. The carnival of Venice was, for a long time, the most famous carnival. From Italy, carnival traditions spread to the Catholic nations of Spain, Portugal, and France. From France, they spread to the Rhineland of Germany, and to New France in North America. From Spain and Portugal, they spread with Catholic colonization to the Caribbean and Latin America.

Many historians believe that the first American Mardi Gras took place on March 3, 1699, when the French explorers Iberville and Bienville landed south of the holiday’s future American epicenter: New Orleans. They held a small celebration and dubbed the spot Point du Mardi Gras. Mardi Gras was observed in Mobile, Alabama, by French soldiers when it was a still a colony of France in 1703. In the decades that followed, New Orleans and other French settlements began marking the holiday with street parties, masked balls and lavish dinners.  When the Spanish took control of New Orleans, however, they abolished these rowdy festivities, and the bans remained in force until Louisiana became part of the United States in 1812.th-2


On Mardi Gras in 1827, a group of students donned colorful costumes and danced through the streets of New Orleans, emulating the revelry they’d observed while visiting Paris. Ten years later, the first recorded New Orleans Mardi Gras parade took place, a tradition that continues to this day. In 1840 the Cowbellion de Rakin Society, a Mobile organizations journeyed to New Orleans to the secret society of New Orleans businessmen called the Mistick Krewe of Comus organize a torch-lit Mardi Gras procession with marching bands and rolling floats, setting the tone for future public celebrations in the city. Since then, krewes have remained a fixture of the Carnival scene throughout Louisiana. The event was well received and continued until it was suspended during the American Civil War. Mardi Gras was one of the first local institutions to be revived after the war. It reappeared in 1866 and has continued to grow in modern times.
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Today, traditional Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans spotlight the King of the Carnival and the Monarch of Merriment, as well as Comus, the God of Revelry. Many people dress up in eye-catching costumes and a spectacular ball is held. Debutantes are introduced at the Ball Tablaeu in their formal introduction to society.

People throw trinkets to crowds as part of the customary “parade throw” at New Orleans’ Mardi Gras celebration. During the Bacchus parade, the king’s float throws doubloons with the image of the “Celebrity King” on one side of the doubloon (cups and toy coins) to parade watchers. Traditional Mardi Gras food includes the King Cake in which a pecan or charm is hidden. The person who gets a piece of the cake with the charm or nut is dubbed the “king” of that year’s Mardi Gras.

Louisiana is the only state in which Mardi Gras is a legal holiday. However, elaborate carnival festivities draw crowds in other parts of the United States during the Mardi Gras season as well, including Alabama and Mississippi. Each region has its own events and traditions.

 

Mardi Gras festivities are particularly colorful in French cities such as Cannes, Grasse, and Nice. Celebrations feature grand parades of flower covered floats with giant figures. People are dressed in costumes and confetti is thrown as an expression of merriment or joy.  A grotesque effigy that represents evil is burned at the end of the day.


It is also traditional in many parts of France to eat a large meal that includes crepes or waffles. Some people in the United Kingdom celebrate the day, known as Pancake Day, with games and races that involve tossing pancakes in the air. People in some parts of northern Sweden eat a meat stew on Shrove Tuesday, while those in the south eat “Shrove Tuesday buns” called semlor, which are filled with almond paste and topped with whipped cream.
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Today, is a the time to party it up, and…Eat! Happy Mardi Gras!
 
_________________________
by
John Copeland
Rancho Olivos
2390 N. Refugio Rd.
Santa Ynez, CA 93460

www.ranchoolivos.com
_________________________
for
Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts
Providing Integrated Alternative Medicine in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)
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“The Whole Kit & Caboodle” for Kentwood ~ Sponsored by Dr. Eric

 

UnknownSo do you guys know what lateral thinking is? Have you heard of project-based learning? You may have recently, especially if you have a student in LAUSD as the new Common Core standards are trying to encompass a bit more of it.  Well, just for fun here’s the definition::

“Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic. The term was coined in 1967 by Edward de Bono.”pimr

If any of you have visited Dr. Eric for help solving a problem that as it turns out, is not straight chiropractic, or if you’ve been there for a headache for example, and walked away with a saliva test kit and two bottles from Standard Process, then you know kinda what I mean.

Dr. Eric likes to use integrated alternative therapies to find the root cause of a person’s dis-ease. He’s not one to rack and crack, and he’s not a big fan of band-aids (metaphorically speaking). He likes to find the ROOT cause of your pain and works to put you back in balance, homeostasis. Often this requires a lot of lateral thinking. That’s one of the reasons why he is good at what he does.  He thinks outside the box – the box of most Western Medicine – and he can help you heal.10984159_10204528413145241_5732512652723273381_n

 

Another thing that Dr. Eric does is sponsor #minimrsdrdahl’s school garden. Which helps to foster the same thing: Lateral learning. That way the kids get the whole kit and caboodle too. Literally. Nutrition, sure, gardening, agriculture, sure, but also history, science, literature, math, social studies, art, homemaking, vocabulary, and even sex-ed.

Today for example, was a red letter day in the Kentwood School garden.

8 months ago, in March, Kentwood kids planted butternut squash seeds. Students visited their budding seedlings during recess most days and watered them as they grew.  Over the summer, our PTO-sponsored drip watering system fed those plants as they turned into vines.  Upon our return in August, they were growing like mad, flowering, and had some small squash beginning. By Fall, those squash were ready to pick.10955207_10204579795429766_4143826007299995770_n

Last year, Dr. Eric was the one who figured that the school, and students would best benefit if we preserved the fruits of their labor, especially over the summer. Luckily, I’m good at canning. And Dr. Eric, ever the one for linguistic puns, coined the term “Koala Food” (the school mascot is Kenny the Koala).  We will be selling the finished products this coming spring, in our silent auction at Family Fun Day. All organic, kid-grown, school garden produce and recipes. So far, we have at least two dozen jars put up.10313056_10204579709067607_3056720641652066879_n

Recently, our wonderful school librarian approached me. She had thought of me, she said, when she read a darling book called “Sophie’s Squash” (Pat Zietlow Miller & Anne Wilsdorf). The story is about a little girl who thinks a butternut squash is so neat, she decides to make it her new toy.  She draws a face on it and takes it with her everywhere just like a baby doll; She cannot be swayed to eat it or switch it out for another toy.  When the squash starts to finally get soft, she consults the farmers market…they tell her to tuck it away in a bed of soil and give it lots of water and it will be happy.  The next season, she visits her squash-friend only to find that it has grown into a vine and has produced more baby squash. Delightful story.11159506_10204724049236021_2094583681756832266_n

“AWESOME!” I said. We just happen to have a butternut squash growing in the school garden right now! Our fantastic librarian went on to approach the fabulous 3rd grade teachers, who’s science unit this year covers seeds and planting. I mentioned that I had recently made “Koala Food” butternut squash soup that they could taste too! And it all fell into place.

Today, 8 months of work came to fruition. I witnessed first hand, the reasons why I do what I do. Why Dr. Eric spends his weekends toiling in the school garden.

So. much. learned. (with only 15 minutes per class!)11060042_10205786786003776_2051472937121527132_n

The 3rd graders and I talked about seasons, the Fall and what that means, what holidays happen in the Autumn, what foods they associate with those holidays. We discussed how butternut squash is similar to pumpkin moreso than zucchini, and how one butternut squash varietal differs from another. I showed them three different kinds of butternut squash.  They recognized the similarity when comparing themselves with their classmates: all human, all kids, all the same, but different – different colors, different shapes, different sizes. Fun new adjectives were used to describe the differences (of the fruits): oblong, bulbous, knobby, smooth, oval, orange, golden, big, giant, petite, graceful, curvy. We learned the meaning of “heirloom,” which like their family’s collectibles or finery, is a very special, handed-down-through-generations seed type that isn’t usually available in standard grocery stores. They recognized thusly the importance of supporting local family farms and supporting their local farmer’s market. 11137164_10205656077856154_2385955535524519663_n

In the eating of the recipe itself, the students had an opportunity to enhance the dimension of their learning.  Sensory appreciations: taste, texture, sweet, salty…”In the soup are apples, onions, sage, cinammon, can you taste them?” I asked. “Can you smell the cinammon?” We passed around fresh sage…doesn’t it complement the flavor of the squash to have a fresh leaf on top? what does the flavor remind you of? It’s a bit like pumpkin pie but not as sweet…do you know the word savory?”11033976_10205733629514897_271465502817944093_n
I asked them questions that made them think or recognize things they might very well have known but never connected. Did they know that butternut squash originated in Mexico? Or that it was cultivated by Native Americans? I asked them if they had any family recipes that were their family’s “heirlooms.” What other vegetables are orange? what makes them so? Betacarotene I told them.  Its good for eyesight. That squash contains a whole alphabet of vitamins: A,B,C, iron, potassium, zinc, and that those things are anti-oxidants that help reduce risk of cancer, cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke – in short, keep you healthy and happy. The seeds contain tryptophan which is used by your body to help your brain. These orange fruits of fall are excellent for your eyes, and more importantly, your hearts and your brains. Perhaps this is another reason why Sophie chose the squash as her friend? Because what is better for your heart or brain than a really good friend? Or your favorite toy? And to remind them daily, the Librarian will keep the garden-fresh butternut squash in the library, wearing its drawn-on happy face, just like Sophie’s.10420118_10205740252080457_7810252065439398266_n

After we tasted the soup, we walked into the garden and saw another squash growing, and other fall fruits, pumpkins and zucchini. The kids noticed the squash blossoms so we talked about these flowers being either male or female and how the plant needs both sexes living happily side by side in order to grow the fruits. The children surmised that it was, of course, the female flowers that grew the squash. Some of them had eaten stuffed squash blossoms before, filled with Mexican (Queso Fresco), French (Chèvre), Greek (Feta), or Italian (Mozzarella) cheese. If they dared, we tasted the leaves too, which are likewise edible, good for you and can even be used in stir-fry, salads, or instead of tortillas for wraps.11954587_10205781085461266_484969480295904598_n

The kids, if interested, will take home the recipe, allowing them to practice at home both the culinary arts, as well as their math (measurement) skills.  Their teachers will dispearse seeds from one of our school-grown squashes and they will grow their own plants, eventually transplanting them, once again, into the school garden. I am hoping they will talk about this with their families which will in turn foster a growing interest in vegetables and eating well. Perhaps, come spring, they will encourage their parents to bid on the Koala Food items in the silent auction, again encouraging health and wellness at home, as well as providing funding for next year’s school garden.10430458_10205741092701472_4669364781077671490_n

There are lots of expressions that come to mind to describe an experience so all encompassing.  The whole kit and caboodle is one.  Going the whole nine yards is another.  The whole shebang.  Going whole hog, going all in…the list goes on. But it is EVERYTHING.

Days spent like this at school are FUN. Learning like this will motivate these kids to grow into future doctors, scientists, farmers, writers, artists, healers, problem solvers. When they grow up, I hope they make a difference in this world…help us find some balance. And, I sure hope they will be as good at what what they do as Dr. Eric is at what HE does. safe_image.php

Oh, and in case you are FIRED up to try the recipe, this is the one that I loosely followed: http://www.chowhound.com/recipes/roasted-butternut-squash-soup-30466

If you’d like to read the darling book: http://www.amazon.com/Sophies-Squash-Pat-Zietlow-Miller/dp/0307978966

Bon Appetite!

Coby Dahlstrom (aka #mrsdrdahl)

for

Dr. Eric P. Dahlstrom, D.C., L.Ac.
Santa Monica Healing Arts3rd grade

Providing Integrated Alternative Therapies, Chiropractic Care, and Acupuncture in Santa Monica since 1999 (http://santamonicahealingarts.com). Check out our 5-star Review on Yelp (http://www.yelp.com/biz/santa-monica-healing-arts-santa-monica) or find us on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Santa-Monica-Healing-Arts)

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twitter: @SMHealingArts
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Sophie’s Squash is the reipient of a number award for children’s literature: 

Booklist Books for Youth Editors’ Choice-WINNER

Golden Kite Award for Fiction-WINNER

School Library Journal Best Book of the Year-WINNER

Children’s Book Committee at Bank Street College Children’s Book of the Year-SELECTION 2014

Charlotte Zolotow Award-HONOR 2014

Ezra Jack Keats New Writer/Illustrator Award-HONOR 2014